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Watch Apple’s Spring Loaded event right here at 10am PT / 1pm ET

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In brief: Apple’s ‘Spring Loaded’ event takes place later today, and you can watch all the reveals right here at 10am PT / 1pm ET. We’re expecting to see a slew of new products, the highlight of which could be the new mini-LED iPad Pro.

The current iPad Pro remains the ‘best of the best’ tablet in our buying guide, but it could be knocked off the top spot by a successor that’s long been rumored to feature mini-LED backlighting for better brightness and longer battery life—though as is the case with every tech product right now, the chip shortage is reportedly impacting production.

The updated iPad Pros are said to come with a new chip that offers M1-like performance, upgraded cameras, and a Thunderbolt port. We might even see a new Apple pencil.

The AirTags could also make an appearance. The Tile-like trackers have been expected for years but failed to materialize. This could be the event where we finally see their announcement, especially now that rival Samsung has launched its Galaxy SmartTags, and third-party AirTags accessories are already available.

As with similar devices, Apple’s little trackers attach to items and can be tracked using Bluetooth and Ultra-Wideband technology. The AirTags will work via the iPhone’s “Find My” app.

Elsewhere, we could see an iPad Mini with a screen larger than the current 7.9 inches (possibly 8.5 inches) and perhaps a refresh of the cheapest, student-aimed iPad with a thinner and lighter design. The AirPods 3 might be revealed (new AirPods Pro are said to be coming later), a refreshed Apple TV with support for HDMI 2.1 and 120Hz refresh rates could be at the show, and Apple is expected to release iOS 14.5 immediately after the event. Some believe Apple will reveal new iMacs powered by its own silicon, though they could be saved for a later event.



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