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Twitter adds DM search feature for Android users

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Twitter is rolling out a new feature for Android users. One will now be able to search their Direct Messages (DMs). This feature will offer relief to those who are not able to find any of their old conversations on Twitter. Once the feature hits your device, you won’t have to scroll through all the DMs to find any particular chat.

“We’ve brought the DM search bar to Android and are rolling out an improved version that lets you search for all of your old convos, not just the most recent ones,” Twitter said. The feature was first made available for iOS users in 2019.

Twitter has also announced on its platform that it will soon let users search for specific content in DMs. There are times when you want to search for a specific chat and you can only find it by typing in the words you remember. The micro-blogging site is saying it is working on this feature and it will be rolled out later this year.

“Waiting for the option to search your DMs for message content? We’re working on releasing that later this year,” the company said. Currently, you will only be able to search for chats by typing in the name of a group or an individual.

Twitter recently opened its Spaces feature to all users who have at least 600 followers. In case you are unaware, Spaces is an audio-only voice chat feature, which allows you to host stream voice chats with other Twitter users. The company is soon expected to a new feature to Spaces, which will be called “Ticketed Spaces.” It will let you monetize Spaces for a monetary fee.

Besides, in order to curb fake news related to COVID-19, Twitter has released new event pages that include the latest Tweets from news organisations across the country and in multiple languages. The company has also published some state-specific Covid pages in India that show the latest tweets from people asking for SOS resources.



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