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Stomach bloating diet: Prevent trapped wind pain without broccoli


Stomach bloating is a common condition that affects most people at some point in their lifetime, said the NHS.

It can make the stomach feel stretched, puffy, and generally uncomfortable.

But making some changes to your diet could help to prevent the condition from coming back.

Eating broccoli could be triggering your bloating pain, it’s been claimed.

Broccoli is a type of cruciferous vegetable that could be causing stomach bloating, warned medical website LiveStrong.

It contains a carbohydrate that isn’t easily broken down in the stomach, and subsequently contributes to trapped gas.

But, it’s an important vegetable that also contains plenty of nutrients that help to boost the immune system.

Simply start with a small portion of broccoli, and build up to the point where you start feel bloated.

“As a member of the cruciferous vegetable family, broccoli is a nutrient-rich protector against inflammation and a potent cancer fighter,” said the medical website.

“Broccoli does contain raffinose, however, an indigestible carbohydrate that, like the FODMAPs compounds, gets gobbled up by bacteria in the colon, releasing gas and potentially causing some bloat.

“Definitely do not drop broccoli from your diet in the name of a less-bloated belly,” added nutritionist Rachel Meltzer Warren.

“Instead, allow your body to guide you on the amount and frequency that feels just right for you.”

You could also be at risk of stomach bloating if you eat too many onions, nutritionists have claimed.

They’re one of the main dietary sources of fructans, which can lead to bloating.

But, cooking the onions before eating them may help to reduce some of their bloating-causing effects.

Standing up while eating and chewing gum could both contribute to stomach bloating.

Swallowing air may also lead to trapped wind, said the NHS. You could swallow air by talking and eating at the same time, or even by using a straw while drinking.

Eating regular meals and downsizing your portion sizes should help to ward off painful stomach swelling.

You should see a GP if your bloating symptoms persist, said the NHS.

Bloating, and persistently feeling full, are key signs of ovarian cancer, it added.



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