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Sex, alcohol, and shopping: the favorite activities of home workers and their high cost

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Editor’s take: One of the many effects of the pandemic is that working from home has become the standard for many people. But are employees taking advantage of being away from the office and the ever-watchful eyes of bosses? In some cases, yes.

A survey from LED lighting firm e-conolight (via ZDNet) asked 1,000 Americans how much of their 40-hour workweek is spent actually working.

The majority of participants (41.9%) said they spend 4-6 hours focused on work each day, while 34.1% put this figure at 7+ hours. However, not everyone is so dedicated: 21.3% focus on work for just 1-3 hours per day, 2.5% spend less than one hour concentrating on their job, and 0.2% don’t concentrate on work at all—one assumes they must have the kind of job where that’s possible.

Despite 76% percent of respondents spending more than four hours each day focused on work, 40% of participants said they spend four or more hours away from their computers. What are they doing during that time? More than half (60%) have taken a nap while on the clock, 42% have been on a date, and 41% have had sex. Almost half said they’ve had an alcoholic drink, while more than three-quarters have shopped online.

All that sex and drunken shopping brings consequences. Half the respondents have been late to a meeting because of non-work-related activities, 44% have been reprimanded, and 39% have been fired for their actions. Interestingly, a massive 45.3% of people said they had done work for another company while on the clock.

The survey illustrates how some people who have suddenly found themselves working from home can struggle to stay professional, treating it as an extended vacation. It’s doubtlessly been a hard lesson to learn for the 39% who lost their job for engaging in activities they would (hopefully) avoid at the office.

Header image credit: Rawpixel.com

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