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Samsung could be working on a tri-fold tablet with new S-Pen support


While it wasn’t an easy way up, Samsung became the first smartphone maker to create a commercially available foldable smartphone back in 2019. Now, three hinged devices later, the brand has a dedicated Z lineup specifically for devices that can fold into half. However, one of Samsung’s next Z-series devices could is expected to be a three-part folding tablet.

As per a new report by Gizmochina, Samsung could be working on a new folding device that is expected to be a three-part folding tablet. This device could feature not one, but two hinges to support the tri-folding mechanism.

Samsung is not the first brand to venture into the tri-fold design, however. Tech brand TCL has already made a prototype for the same and other brands too are getting into the new design. However, Samsung’s implementation could end up being the first such device that users can actually purchase.

The report further adds that the tablet could be launched in Q1 2022 and could be called the Galaxy Z Fold Tab. We could likely see more official details on the product being shared during the Galaxy Z Fold 3 and Galaxy Z Flip 3 launch event that is expected to be held in August.

Hybrid S-Pen

Apart from the tri-folding display, the Galaxy Z Fold Tab will also bring support for a hybrid S-Pen, something that is also expected to launch with the new Galaxy Z Fold 3 in a few months. While the new stylus is expected to bring more functionality than Samsung’s older implementations, more details on the same are not available right now.

The new tablet is also expected to feature a better UTG (Ultra-Thin Glass), as per the report. The thicker implementation will also be introduced in the Galaxy Z Fold 3. Not a lot of other details are available on the device so far but more leaks are expected to surface closer to the launch.



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