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Regulatory listings seem to confirm rumors of an Arm-based MacBook Air coming in 2020

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Rumor mill: Regulatory listings with the China Compulsory Certificate database (C3) and Demark’s UL Demko for a new battery reveal that Apple has a product with a unique model number (A2389). The 4,380mAh 49.9 watt-hour battery is too much for an iPhone or iPad, so A2389 is likely a new Macbook.

As 9to5Mac notes, current Apple MacBooks have larger batteries. For example, the MacBook Pro has an 8,00mAh powerpack. So, it’s safe to assume that the 4,380mah is for something smaller like a MacBook Air. While the current MacBook Air has a 5,100mAh battery, its wattage is listed as 49.9Wh, just like the listings. So this would jive with a new addition to the Air lineup.

If this is the case, Apple could be getting ready to reveal the first of its Arm-based laptops. Cupertino already refreshed its Intel-powered laptops earlier this year, so it would not make sense that it has more of the same coming.

An unveiling of a new laptop equipped with Apple silicon would confirm what noted analyst Ming Chi-Kuo predicted earlier this month. Kuo said that the company was ready to release two new laptops before the end of the year featuring the new architecture.

One of the predicted laptops Kuo said would be a 13-inch MacBook Pro, which doesn’t seem a good fit for the smaller battery. However, the other is supposed to be a MacBook Air of unknown size. That product would fall in line with the A2389 listing.

Of course, we’re still dealing with conjecture here, so take it with a grain of salt. Apple has not officially announced anything concrete. However, the evidence seems to indicate it is set to unveil an Arm-based MacBook Air. We will likely find out one way or another at Apple’s usual September showing, a little over a month away.





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Written by sortiwa

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