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EA is bringing its game subscription service to Steam on August 31

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In context: Electronic Arts and Valve don’t usually get along, but in recent months, tensions between the two competing game companies have begun to cool. EA has brought several of its previously Origin-exclusive titles to Valve’s digital storefront, Steam, and a few days ago, we learned that it will be doing the same thing with its EA Play subscription service.

Now, we know exactly when that’s happening: come August 31, EA fans can pay $5 a month to gain unlimited access to a massive library of the company’s games; including Battlefield V, Star Wars: Battlefront II, The Sims 4, Titanfall, and much more.

EA Play is already available on Origin for PC players (as well as the Xbox One and PlayStation 4 for console gamers), but its expansion to Steam should make it considerably more accessible.

We’re not entirely sure how EA’s subscription service will interact with Steam’s library and store systems. After all, most Steam games are one-time purchases, and once you acquire a game, it remains in your library forever, unless you refund it. It’ll be interesting to see how the platform adapts to accommodate EA Play, and perhaps other similar services in the future.

The version of EA Play that will be coming to Steam in a couple weeks is reportedly the standard edition of the service. There’s a higher-tier, $15/month “EA Play Pro” variant that removes many of the base subscription’s restrictions (such as playtime limits on new games), but it will still be exclusive to Origin.

With that in mind, EA’s decision to port EA Play to Steam is a wise marketing move. It will let Steam’s userbase get a taste of what the service has to offer, but if they want the full Pro experience, they’ll have to move to Origin, which is all the better for EA.



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Written by sortiwa

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