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Android 12’s App Hibernation feature will automatically help clear storage space


Android 12, which is Google’s next major software update, will bring a new feature called App Hibernation. It is basically an improved version of the “auto revoke permissions” feature which was introduced with Android 11 last year. It can automatically change app permissions if an app remains untouched for more than two months. Now, the new Android 12 feature will help clear up storage space by removing temporary files, as per a report by XDA Developers.

The new App Hibernation feature was spotted on a leaked build of Android 12. The cited source has shared some screenshots as well. They show that when an app is not touched for a few months, then certain “permissions are removed to protect your data,” “notifications are stopped to save battery,” and “temporary files are removed to free up space.”

The screenshots suggest that the feature removes all the key permissions that an doesn’t require when not in use. These include camera, location, phone and other permissions. XDA reported that the new auto-hibernate feature is located on the “Unused Apps” page in the Settings section > Apps. The feature even gives information on when was the last time the app was used.

Currently, you will find the old “auto revoke permissions” feature in a different name. All you need to do is visit the settings section on your phone and type “App permissions” on the search bar. You then need to open any app and then tap on “See all the permissions.” At the end of the page, you will see “remove permissions if the app isn’t used.”

You enable or disable this feature as per your preference. Do note that this feature is available on devices that are running on Android 11 OS. It is important to note that there is no confirmation on whether the new App Hibernation feature will make its way to the final build as this feature was spotted on a leaked build of Android 12.



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