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Amazon releases patch for Echo Buds to address overheating issue

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In brief: By all accounts, Amazon’s Echo Buds are one of the better products in the truly-wireless earbud market. Unfortunately, despite their overall quality, a serious flaw in the Echo Buds’ firmware recently caused them to overheat in their case in “rare” situations.

It doesn’t sound like any users have been substantially impacted by this flaw as of writing, but it’s still a real problem, and it’s one Amazon is wisely taking seriously. Amazon has already patched the problem with the latest Buds software update, while improving their battery life at the same time.

The company has already started to send out emails to Buds owners that inform them of the risk, and urge them to update. An excerpt from one such email reads as follows:

We are writing to inform you about an important software update for your Echo Buds.

The safety of our customers is our top priority. We recently determined that in very rare cases it is possible for Echo Buds to overheat while in the charging case. Out of an abundance of caution, we have released a software update that addresses this potential safety risk and improves the long-term performance of Echo Buds’ batteries.

The apparent speed with which Amazon responded to this debacle is commendable. It’s not unheard of for large tech companies to ignore problems like this until they’re forced to address them, due to either public or political pressure.

If you’re concerned about running into the overheating problem with your own pair of Buds, don’t fret too much. As long as your pair is charged, stowed in its carrying case, and linked to a phone with a reliable internet connection, they should automatically receive the latest software updates (including this security fix).

To confirm that you aren’t at risk, be sure to check the Echo Buds entry in your smartphone’s Alexa app. As reported by Android Central, if the app claims your Buds are running software version 318119151 or newer, you should be in the clear.

Image credit: Liam Sorta via Shutterstock



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