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Amazon confirms Nvidia RTX 3060 Ti price and next week’s launch date


Highly anticipated: While we’ve seen repeated leaks regarding the RTX 3060 Ti and its release date, many of the sources haven’t exactly been reliable. But the latest reveal comes from Amazon UK and is backed by one of the country’s largest tech retailers, both of which confirm the long-rumored December 2 release date.

With photos and benchmarks of the RTX 3060 Ti flooding the internet over the last few weeks, the launch of the card, still not confirmed by Nvidia, seemed inevitable.

Now, Amazon UK is listing the MSI GeForce RTX 3060 Ti Ventus 2X OC for pre-order with a release date of December 2. It corroborates reports that the card features 8GB of GDDR6 memory and a memory clock speed of 1400 MHz.

MSI’s RTX 3060 Ti is selling on Amazon for £490.18, which works out at around $655. It’s important to note that tech goods in the UK cost much more than their US counterparts, mostly because of the extra tax. UK retailer Scan, meanwhile, lists the Gigabyte NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 Ti EAGLE 8GB with a December 2 launch date, though there’s no price right now.

Tom’s Hardware notes that MSI’s RTX 3060 Ti is for sale for between €550 ($655) and €685 ($816) in several European countries, while versions of the card from Gigabyte, Inno3D, and Zotac are listed in Estonia, Latvia, and Spain for €484 ($576) and €592 ($705).

Those are all very expensive, even taking into consideration the difference in overseas prices, but we still haven’t had confirmation of the MSRP, which is rumored to be between $349 and $399. It could just be that these third-party cards cost more, especially as this will likely be another tech product with low availability at launch.

Earlier this week, the RTX 3060 Ti appeared in the Ashes of the Singularity database, beating all Turing offerings bar the RTX 2080 Super. We’ve also seen numerous images of the card leak online.



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